Wireless at the speed of plasma

Antennas that use plasma to focus beams of radio waves could bring us superfast wireless networks

BEFORE you leave for work in the morning, your smartphone downloads the latest episode of a television series. Your drive to work is easy in spite of fog, thanks to in-car radar and the intelligent transport software that automatically guides you around traffic jams, allowing you to arrive in time for a presentation in which high-definition video is streamed flawlessly to your tablet computer in real time.

This vision of the future may not be far off, thanks to a new type of antenna that makes use of plasma consisting of only electrons. It could revolutionise high-speed wireless communications, miniature radar and even energy weapons.

Existing directional antennas that transmit high-frequency radio waves require expensive materials or precise manufacturing. But the new antenna, called Plasma Silicon Antenna, or PSiAN, relies on existing low-cost manufacturing techniques developed for silicon chips. It has been developed by Plasma Antennas of Winchester, UK.

Continue reading

Free SMS to Handphone from mostsms.com

Hantar SMS ke semua nombor talian handphone mudahalih anda dengan PERCUMA

Free SMS

Send free SMS to any mobile in Malaysia.

Simplicity

Developed with its quick and easy control panel.

Phonebook

Keep all your contacts organized for easy access.

SMS Templates

 

1) REGISTER FREE SINI ( Sign up with valid mobile)reg dgn hp yang aktif

2) Selepas Register.. Pin akan di sms ke hp
A SMS pin will send to your mobile

3) Daftar masuk dan tukar no pin anda dan mulakan sms
Login to change your pin and begin SMS

Solar panel from hair…A hoax or real??

Teenager invents £23 solar panel that could be solution to developing world’s energy needs … made from human hair

By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 1:52 PM on 10th September 2009

A new type of solar panel using human hair could provide the world with cheap, green electricity, believes its teenage inventor.

Milan Karki, 18, who comes from a  village in rural Nepal, believes he has found the solution to the developing world’s energy needs.

article-0-06546E62000005DC-46_468x286

The young inventor says hair is easy to use as a conductor in solar panels and could revolutionise renewable energy.

Hair-raising: Science student Milan Karki with his innovative solar panel made with human hair while a friend holds a light bulb above his head

‘First I wanted to provide electricity for my home, then my village. Now I am thinking for the whole world,’ said Milan, who attends school in the capital, Kathmandu.

The hair replaces silicon, a pricey component typically used in solar panels, and means the panels can be produced at a low cost for those with no access to power, he explained.

In Nepal, one of the poorest countries in the world, many rural areas lack access to electricity and even in areas connected to power lines, users face shortages of up to 16 hours a day.

Milan and four classmates initially made the solar panel as an experiment but the teens are convinced it has wide applicability and commercial viability.

EFG9392
Close shave:  Milan (second from right) demonstrates his solar panel in a tiny barber shop in Kathmandu

‘I’m trying to produce commercially and distribute to the districts. We’ve already sent a couple out to the districts to test for feasibility,’ he said.

The solar panel, which produces 9 V (18 W) of energy, costs around £23 to make from raw materials.

But if they were mass-produced, Milan says they could be sold for less than half that price, which could make them a quarter of the price of those already on the market.

Melanin, a pigment that gives hair its colour, is light sensitive and also acts as a type of conductor. Because hair is far cheaper than silicon the appliance is less costly.

article-0-06546F9D000005DC-575_468x313

Hair today: A detailed shot shows the human hair used as an alternative to silicon

The solar panel can charge a mobile phone or a pack of batteries capable of providing light all evening.

Milan began his quest to create electricity when he was a boy living in Khotang, a remote district of Nepal completely unconnected to electricity. According to him, villagers were skeptical of his invention at first.

‘They believe in superstitions, they don’t believe in science. But now they believe,’ he said.

article-0-06547256000005DC-635_468x286
Cost effective: The solar-hair panel is estimated to be four times cheaper than an industrial made solar panel of comparable capacity

He first tried to use water currents hydro power  on a small scale, but said the experiment became too expensive.

‘I searched for new, other renewable, affordable sources. People in these places are living the life of the stone age even in the 21st century,’ he said.

Milan, whose hero is the inventor Thomas Eddison, describes himself as lucky because his family could afford for him to receive a proper education while many other villagers are forced to work from an early age. Most of those from his village are illiterate.

He was originally inspired after reading a book by physicist Stephen Hawking, which discussed ways of creating static energy from hair.

article-0-06547172000005DC-352_468x312
It’s got the power: A digital multimeter shows the voltage generated by the innovative panel

‘I realised that Melanin was one of the factors in conversion of energy,’ he said.

Half a kilo of hair can be bought for only 16p in Nepal and lasts a few months, whereas a pack of batteries would cost 50p and last a few nights.

People can replace the hair easily themselves, says Milan, meaning his solar panels need little servicing.

Three years after first coming up with the idea, Milan says the idea is more important than ever because of the crucial need for renewable energies in the face of finite power sources and global warming.

‘Slowly, natural resources are degrading so it is necessary to think about the future,” he said.

‘One day we will be in a great crisis regarding this fuel so it is a good thing to do today.

‘This is an easy solution for the crisis we are having today. We have begun the long walk to save the planet.’